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How high potency marijuana impacts mental health

| Oct 22, 2020 | Drug Charges |

It isn’t uncommon for individuals in North Carolina and throughout the country to use cannabis. However, research suggests that using this substance can have an adverse impact on your mental health. The type of cannabis that you use as well as how often you use it could play a role in determining the severity of the impact it might have on your life.

It may be possible to become addicted to cannabis

While many people believe that you cannot become addicted to marijuana, this is not necessarily the case. A study called “Children of the ’90s” found that participants who used high-potency versions of this substance reported issues trying to wean themselves off of it. High-potency marijuana contains a higher level of tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, which is primarily responsible for the effects that you feel when using it.

High potency marijuana linked to anxiety

The study also found that those who reported using high-potency marijuana were twice as likely to have anxiety. Furthermore, they were more likely to report having problems at home or work because of their inability to stop using cannabis. In addition to a higher risk of developing anxiety disorders, study participants who used marijuana with elevated levels of THC were more likely to experience psychotic episodes.

If you are convicted of using or possessing marijuana, you could face significant penalties such as a fine or jail time. You may also be required to take part in a rehab program or fulfill other requirements if you’re convicted of these or similar charges. A drug crimes attorney may be able to help you obtain a plea deal or an acquittal by having evidence suppressed or by casting doubt on the evidence used at trial.

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