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What parents and teens should know about marijuana use

| Oct 30, 2020 | Drug Charges |

Teens around the country may be less likely to use marijuana in states where its recreational use is allowed by law, although it is not yet legal in North Carolina. This is according to a study that was published in JAMA Pediatrics. Researchers believe that this may be because it can be harder for minors to obtain the controlled substance from a licensed dispensary as opposed to a dealer on the street.

Evidence suggests marijuana use is harmful for younger people

The American Academy of Pediatrics has said that using marijuana can have a negative impact on a teenager’s mental and physical health. Furthermore, the product that people consume today tends to have a higher level of THC, which increases the risk that a user will become dependent on the substance. Marijuana produced in recent years has an average THC content of 12.2%, which is almost four times higher than it was in the 1990s.

Teens tend to be influenced by the actions of others

Researchers suggest that parents may be more inclined to talk to their children about the dangers of drug use in states where it has been legalized. Conversations about the negative consequences of using marijuana or other substances may dissuade a minor from doing so. However, parents should also be aware that using drugs around their children may send the message that its safe to do so. Therefore, they may want to stop using around their teens or stop using altogether for the sake of their sons or daughters.

If you or your child are charged with drug possession or other drug crimes, it may be a good idea to speak with a criminal defense attorney. An attorney may be able to negotiate a plea deal or take other steps to help you or your child obtain a favorable result.

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