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Can I receive a drug charge if I do not have a prescription?

| Oct 23, 2017 | Blog |

When you think of drug charges, the first thing that may come to mind is a drug dealer. You do not need to sell narcotics to end up with a criminal drug charge in North Carolina. If you are apprehended and it is found you have opioids or prescription drugs on your person that you do not have a legal prescription for, you could end up with criminal drug charges.

There has been a sharp uptick in the number of criminal cases involving prescription drugs. Many offenders find themselves facing serious consequences that can linger and affect them and their close family members for the rest of their lives. Here is a brief overview of common prescription drugs that can lead to criminal drug possession and intent to sell charges. 

Common prescription drugs that can lead to a criminal record 

Opioids are often prescribed for serious medical conditions and used to treat pain. Some people rely on them so much that they become addicted. Once their prescriptions run out, they resort to obtaining and using the substance illegally. Improper opioid use often leads to overdose and death. Some commonly prescribed and abused opioids include: 

  •        Fentanyl
  •        Xanax
  •        Oxycodone
  •        Morphine
  •        Codeine

Opioids are federally classified controlled substances. If you are caught with these drugs, you could end up with state and federal charges. The severity of your charges is dependent on how much of the substance was found in your possession. Minute amounts usually result in a simple possession charge. If you had a lot of narcotics and selling as well as distribution paraphernalia, you could end up with a drug trafficking offense. 

Regardless of your innocence or guilt, you have the right to procure a defense attorney to defend you. Keep in mind that you have the option of using a public defender, but they usually have heavy caseloads and may not provide you with the proper defense strategy. Many people find it beneficial to work with a criminal defense attorney to improve the outcome of their situations.

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