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North Carolina’s ‘Operation Patriot’ leads to 153 arrests

| Mar 27, 2015 | Drug Charges |

There are many reasons why a person may have an outstanding warrant against them. From accusations of drug offenses to allegations of breaking the conditions of their parole, it is not unknown for a North Carolinian to be facing the long arm of the law.

Recently, a movement known as “Operation Patriot” led to the arrest of 153 individuals in North Carolina. Operation Patriot was a combined effort of local, state and federal authorities, occurred from March 17 to March 19 and spanned the area of four counties.

The counties in which the operation took place have a large military presence. The goal of the operation was to ascertain the location of those who have allegedly broken their probation or parole conditions, complete the service of warrants that were outstanding and check for compliance on certain probationers that were deemed to be high-risk.

During the course of Operation Patriot, authorities completed over 230 searches and served over 300 warrants that were outstanding. In addition, drugs including marijuana, cocaine and heroin were seized, as were four firearms. Police also seized $4,200 in cash.

As this shows, law enforcement will go to great lengths to apprehend those they believe have committed a crime. In fact, sometimes police overreach goes too far, and an innocent person is charged with a crime they didn’t commit.

When facing criminal charges, it is important for the accused individual to pursue a strong case, often with the help of a criminal defense attorney. After all, each person has the opportunity to present his or her case in court to a fair and impartial judge or jury. This can lead to a “not guilty” verdict, allowing the individual to move forward with his or her life.

Source: WNCN, “153 arrested in NC counties with big military presence,” March 23, 2015

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