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How does drug court work in North Carolina?

On Behalf of | Jun 27, 2022 | Drug Charges |

When you face a drug-related criminal charge in North Carolina, the charge may result from actions you take due to a substance dependency, such as a reliance on opiates or cocaine. Many offenders facing drug charges would likely not find themselves in this position had it not been for their substance dependencies. If you count yourself among them, you may want to explore the possibility of gaining entry into a North Carolina drug court program.

Per the North Carolina Judicial Branch, North Carolina operates adult drug court programs in many counties, including New Hanover County.

What the program does

Drug court programs combine accountability with treatment to help dependent drug users develop the skills they need to abstain from using. As a participant, you should expect to have to undergo drug treatment, appear periodically before court administrators and uphold any other compliance obligations your county program requires. If you complete the program, it may lead to the dismissal of your drug charge, among other possible outcomes.

Who is eligible for the program

You may be able to enter drug court if you are a repeat offender, you face possible jail time and the offense you face is not violent in nature. You also have to receive a diagnosis of being either chemically dependent or a diagnosis of borderline chemically dependent based on certain screening criteria. Your offense must also be one of several types of offenses. Furthermore, you must be eligible for an intermediate punishment for any charges currently pending against you.

Studies show that drug courts work and that they help many drug offenders avoid re-entering the criminal justice system.

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