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Can drug rehab help you get a job?

On Behalf of | Mar 15, 2022 | Drug Charges |

Drug convictions can create a hurdle when it comes time for you to get a job. Particularly, if an employer requires you to pass a background check, you may wonder if it is even worth your time to apply.

If you have completed a drug rehabilitation program, you may wonder if that will help your cause. The short answer is that it may. Showing evidence of your desire to change and improve may be enough to convince an employer of your potential.

Talking about rehab

Blurting out your completion of rehab at the wrong time may come across as a desperate plea for help. Sharing your experience may definitely help solidify your reputation, but knowing when to talk about your situation can help you avoid embarrassing circumstances. According to GoodHire, an employer may see your participation in a drug rehab program as evidence of your change. If they feel you are less likely to re-offend, they may also view you as a lower risk and thus a more probable choice for hire.

Never say anything about drug rehab on your job application or resume. However, if your drug conviction comes up in an interview conversation, you can talk about your experience including your completion of rehab. You can point the interviewer’s attention toward what you have learned.

Showing your potential

Contrary to what some may think, having a drug conviction on your record does not mean you will never get a job. Your ability to follow application instructions, dress professionally, show enthusiasm for the job and communicate assertively are all ways to show your potential and establish a good first impression.

Discussing your completion of drug rehab strategically may be the boost an interviewer needs to consider you as an employee.

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