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Should I refuse a field sobriety test from a police officer?

| Mar 13, 2021 | Drunk Driving Charges |

If a police officer suspects you of driving while impaired in North Carolina, you’re likely to get pulled over. When this happens, officers often ask the people they pull over to perform a field sobriety test. But should you perform this test for a police officer? With that in mind, here’s more information about what happens if you refuse a field sobriety test.

Should I take a field sobriety test?

It’s important to note that you have the option to accept or decline a field sobriety test. In most cases, this test allows a police officer to confirm their suspicions about your condition. If a police officer suspects that you’re guilty of a DUI/DWI, they’ll probably arrest you anyway, regardless of your willingness to perform a field sobriety test.

What happens if I refuse a field sobriety test?

Refusing a field sobriety test can be a smart move, depending on your situation. However, refusing to take this test will likely cause an officer to suspect that you’re being untruthful and result in you getting arrested. If you choose to refuse your field sobriety test, be respectful. You don’t want to be aggressive, which might lead to you facing more charges.

Even if you were to pass your field sobriety tests, a police officer can still take you to jail. But, passing all of your tests can help an attorney’s case that there wasn’t probable cause for a police officer to arrest you.

Have you recently been arrested for either a DUI or DWI? If so, it might be wise to contact a criminal defense attorney. An attorney can take a closer look at your case, which might help lessen your sentence or avoid criminal charges altogether.

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