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Investigators say man accused in drug trafficking is TSA employee

| Nov 19, 2016 | Drug Charges |

A 28-year-old North Carolina man who was employed by the Transportation Security Agency is facing drug-related charges. While there is no evidence that he used the Charlotte-Douglas International Airport, where he worked, in his drug trafficking, authorities say that he did use his TSA badge to throw off law enforcement suspicion as he traveled between various locations.

The man is one of nine people total who are facing charges including distribution of controlled substances, and possession of schedule I and II controlled substances with the intent to distribute. Both cocaine and marijuana were involved.

A news release from the U.S. Department of Justice says the man would drive from Charlotte to Greensboro where he would meet with some of the others involved. The TSA has released a statement saying that it will investigate any alleged conduct that is immoral, illegal or unethical.

As this case demonstrates, drug charges can also have consequences that go beyond the legal ones. If a person is involved in a profession such as law enforcement or in areas such as sports, education or politics, drug charges can also affect their career. A conviction for drug possession or trafficking could mean losing financial aid for a student. Therefore, depending on a person’s individual circumstances, they might have different aims when it comes to drug charges. A person who already has charges on their record might focus on trying to get a reduced sentence, such as less jail time, while a person who is facing charges for the first time might try to get the charges reduced or dismissed. For example, an attorney might look at whether a person’s civil rights were violated in the investigation.

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